Tuesday, September 18, 2018

X ANON .. TIME TO WAKE UP

The World Has Never Seen Anything Like What’s Happening at the Equator Right Now

[Mother Jones] The map looks terrifyingly unfamiliar. Not because of the outlines of the continents; those are comforting in their hooks, tails, splotches, and whorls. It’s the storms. Across the globe’s tropics right now, seven superstorms are swirling over oceans. Hurricane Florence is butting into the Carolinas on North America’s southeastern coast. Tropical storms Helene, Isaac, and Joyce are hovering over the Atlantic like jets stacked on approach to Charlotte. Tropical cyclone Barijat is breaking up as it makes landfall at the Gulf of Tonkin while the Philippines and the rest of southeast Asia girds itself for Super Typhoon Mangkhut.
So, fine, sure, it’s hurricane season. Stormy weather, yes, but climatology said this was going to happen. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has said that science doesn’t know if a warming planet will have more hurricanes, but its assembled researchers do agree that what hurricanes happen will be worse. More intense wind, more rain, parked for longer over coastal cities unprepared for 100-year-storms that now come once every five years instead.
Still, though, a map of a planet with semi-permanent storms around its belt, with a violently churning equator…that starts to look otherworldly. It’s more like the planet-spanning white storms of Saturn, or the swirling atmosphere of Neptune. It’s the sign of a planet in the throes of change, and those changes don’t look good for the future.
Humans are used to the idea of some parts of their homeworld being all but uninhabitable. The arctic regions, even as they lose more and more of their icy expanses to a warmer atmosphere, are essentially no-go regions without intense scientific support. Yes, there are scattered settlements above the Arctic Circle, and some of the bases in Antarctica are technically permanent, in that there are humans there year round, even in the permanent darkness of austral winter. But no human lives in Antarctica, and even temporary visits require protective gear and technical support. Parts of the world’s deserts are all but uninhabited, and researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry have argued that some climate change models put the hottest daytime temperatures in the Middle East and North Africa above survivable levels for humans. Read More

Saturday, September 01, 2018

DEW Laser Fires Proven Conclusively...Again & Again & Again

California’s blistering wildfire season has taken a devastating toll

[Think Progess] One of the worst wildfire periods in California’s history is slowly winding down, with the majority of the state’s deadly fires now contained or nearly under control.
Of the 16 wildfires that tore through the state earlier this month, all but five are now contained. That includes the Mendocino Complex fire, which burned for a month and is now the worst wildfire in California’s recorded history. That fire is a complex of two fires, the Ranch fire and the River fire, both of which began burning in July.
According to an August 30 report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, the Ranch fire is 93 percent contained, with 410,182 acres still impacted. The River fire is limited to 48,920 acres and is 100 percent contained, although smoke and hazy conditions persist around the entire area.
While containment does not mean that a wildfire has finished burning, it does indicate that either a man-made or natural barrier is keeping a fire from spreading. Read More

Here's How America Uses Its Land

[Bloomberg] There are many statistical measures that show how productive the U.S. is. Its economy is the largest in the world and grew at a rate of 4.1 percent last quarter, its fastest pace since 2014. The unemployment rate is near the lowest mark in a half century.
What can be harder to decipher is how Americans use their land to create wealth. The 48 contiguous states alone are a 1.9 billion-acre jigsaw puzzle of cities, farms, forests and pastures that Americans use to feed themselves, power their economy and extract value for business and pleasure.
Using surveys, satellite images and categorizations from various government agencies, the U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the U.S. into six major types of land. The data can’t be pinpointed to a city block—each square on the map represents 250,000 acres of land. But piecing the data together state-by-state can give a general sense of how U.S. land is used.
Gathered together, cropland would take up more than a fifth of the 48 contiguous states. Pasture and rangeland would cover most of the Western U.S., and all of the country’s cities and towns would fit neatly in the Northeast. Read More

Presidential Proclamation on National Preparedness Month, 2018

[White House] National Preparedness Month is a time to focus our attention on the importance of preparing our families, homes, businesses, and communities for disasters that threaten our lives, property, and homeland.  During this time, we also honor the brave men and women who selflessly respond to crises and disasters, rendering aid to those in need.  These first responders, who work tirelessly to safeguard our Nation and protect our citizens, deserve our utmost gratitude and appreciation.
Over the past year, communities nationwide and across the Territories have witnessed and endured damage from multiple hurricanes, wildfires, tornadoes, floods, volcanic eruptions, and other natural disasters.  The historic hurricane season of 2017 included three catastrophic storms that made landfall within a month, and was followed by a destructive series of wildfires in California.  Combined, these natural disasters affected 47 million people and tens of thousands were mobilized to provide aid, comfort, and assistance.  We are also especially mindful of those currently affected by ongoing wildfires in California, Oregon, and Colorado.  In spite of tremendous challenges, the resilience of the American people continues to prevail.
Tragedies are somber reminders that preparedness is a shared responsibility and that it is critical to maintain readiness.  All Americans can prepare for potential disasters by developing and practicing a family emergency response plan, assembling a disaster supply kit, signing up for alerts on mobile devices, setting aside emergency savings, and maintaining adequate insurance policies for their homes and businesses.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Ready Campaign outlines other important steps to best prepare for a major disaster.
This month, I encourage all Americans to take the opportunity to ensure they have an emergency response plan in place and ready to be properly executed.  Emergencies and disasters test the resilience and strength of families, communities, and our Nation.  It is impossible to avoid every challenge and threat, but we can and must prepare for them.  By doing so, we can help protect our communities and save lives.

Thursday, July 19, 2018

The collapse of Antarctica's most vulnerable ice shelves would just be the start of our problems

[Mashable] There's a reasonable chance that Antarctica's two most vulnerable ice shelves — the ends of massive glaciers that float over the ocean — will succumb to Earth's warming climate and eventually collapse into the sea.
These particular shelves, known as Larsen C and George VI, are perched on the Antarctic Peninsula — the finger that runs up towards South America. Glacial scientists have now gauged how much oceans would rise if the ice shelves fail, and the news isn't good.
The research, published Thursday in the journal The Cryosphere, shows that taken together, the glaciers' overall contribution to rising seas wouldn't be enormous — adding some 10 millimeters (under half an inch) by the end of the century.
But their collapse is a harbinger of what's to come: The Antarctic coasts are covered in ice shelves, and if they begin to collapse, rivers of ice, or glaciers, will be unleashed into the ocean, boosting sea levels even more.
The shelves act as formidable "plugs," holding back thick masses of Antarctic ice from flowing into the water.
"These are just the two ice shelves considered to have the greatest risk of collapse at present," Nicholas Barrand, a glaciologist and study coauthor, said over email. "There are many, many more ice shelves in Antarctica, and many of them are much, much larger."
In 2002, an ice shelf the size of Rhode Island, Larsen B (just north of Larsen C), crumbled into the ocean and broke apart. Read More

There Are Wildfires Burning in the Arctic Circle Amid Sweden's Record-Breaking Heat Wave

[TIME] As a record-breaking heat wave scorches Sweden, dozens of wildfires are raging in parts of the country.
According to local media, at least 40 fires were burning in parts of Sweden on Wednesday, which have prompted evacuations from three Swedish counties. The Guardian says that 11 of the fires are inside the Arctic Circle.
Italy has sent two planes and Norway eight helicopters to assist in firefighting efforts, but Sweden’s Civil Contingencies Agency has appealed to the E.U. for more aerial assistance, saying the fires were the worst in modern times.
“This is definitely the worst year in recent times for forest fires,” Mike Peacock, a university researcher and local resident told The Guardian.
The fires are happening alongside a heatwave that has been plaguing Northern Europe all summer, causing record-breaking highs across Scandinavia.
One village just north of Sweden’s Arctic Circle, Kvikkjokk, hit just above 90 degrees Fahrenheit.
Downtown Helsinki, Finland’s capital, hit 86 degrees Fahrenheit for the first time in eight years, the Weather Channel reports.
Bardufoss, a town in northern Norway, hit an all-time record when temperatures soared to 92.3 degrees on Wednesday.
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, continental Europe has had its warmest May and second-warmest June since 1910.

Friday, June 08, 2018

Guatemala town destroyed by volcano thought it was safe

[ABC] Orlando Paez plans never to go back to his hamlet of San Miguel Los Lotes, where he narrowly escaped an onrushing river of superheated volcanic ash as his dying neighbors screamed for help.
"I don't know what they are going to do with this land," Paez said days after Guatemala's Volcano of Fire violently erupted, "but please, nobody should ever be allowed to live there again."
A good question is why authorities ever allowed it in the first place.
Nestled on the flanks of the extremely active volcano, the village was square in the path of a gulch that channeled the downhill flow of fast-moving hot rock, ash and debris when the mountain erupted Sunday, burying homes up to their rooftops.
At least 109 people were killed and nearly 200 remain missing, according to the most recent official toll.
While the volcano hadn't produced a similar town-destroying outburst since 1974, it has been almost continuously active since 2002, and over the past year, it has repeatedly sent lava or superheated flows of ash and debris running down ravines on its flanks, sometimes for more than a mile (more than 2 kilometers).
Still, locals said that since the village was first settled in the 1950s as housing for coffee pickers who worked on local plantations, such rivers of ash and rock had never flowed through Los Lotes.
Residents thought they were safe.
"Not disaster officials, not anybody, nobody knew what was going to happen," said Efrain Suarez, 59, a truck driver who lived in the neighboring village of El Rodeo and whose relatives lived in Los Lotes.
Locals said any ash flows normally would travel down a deeper gulch, called Las Lajas, just to the north.
But in the decades since the Volcano of Fire's last major eruption, the government had built a bridge across the gully of Las Lajas.
Suarez believes that bridge — seen collapsing as the ash flow hit it in a video widely shared on social media — may have had fatal consequences.
The downward flow became blocked by the bridge and debris that piled up behind it, causing it to overflow into the narrow valley just to the south, where Los Lotes is located, he said.
"It changed course because the gully couldn't hold the ash flow. It came too rapidly, and there was too much of it," Suarez said.
Disaster preparedness officials did not respond to repeated requests for comment.
Enrique Godoy, the head of Propuesta Urbana, a nonprofit specializing in development issues, said Guatemala suffers from a triple problem: weak institutions; a huge amount of informal housing built by poor residents wherever they can; and a lack of land use and zoning regulations, which exist in only five of the country's 340 townships.
The government technically has the power to declare an area high risk and order people to leave, he said, but "what do you do with the people living there? You can go and tell them to leave, but that becomes a very big social problem. Somebody has to relocate them, and who is going to pay for that?"
Paez was lucky. He lived in one of the homes on the far edge of Los Lotes, and he and his family were able to get out just in time. But all around them, he saw and heard people dying.
"I saw people burned, people torn apart, legs, heads lying there," Paez recalled.
Paez's family was typical of Los Lotes' haphazard growth over the years, with five sons each building a dwelling on a plot their grandparents had settled.
The houses were at various stages of construction, some little more than tin-roof huts held up by poles, others of cinderblock or brick. The government built a brick school and a water cistern.
Now it all stands to be abandoned. Rainfall has turned the huge ash field into a hard, concrete-like terrain, and residents are increasingly convinced that those bodies still buried will never be recovered.
"Perhaps a fourth of the people got out," Paez estimated. "Most of the people are buried there. Our whole lives are buried there, everything, our homes."
Another Los Lotes resident who survived the volcano, Alonso Castillo, estimated that more than 400 people lived in the town.
The government had also allowed a luxury golf course and housing development to be built near the volcano, and it too was ruined, though there were no reports of anyone killed there.
But 99 percent of natural disaster problems happen in poor, informally built communities, Godoy said, and one complicating factor for towns like Los Lotes is that they have existed for decades. Read More

Sun Simulator & New Planetary Bodies

[ATAM] The technology and science you see being used today that claims to be the result of recent breakthroughs in science is at least 40 years old. There have been discoveries on the planet left by ancient civilizations that were very technologically advanced, that we benefit from today. There is also reverse engineered technology from crashed space crafts (UFO’s), as well as an exchange of technology from various alien races visiting the planet. We, the people do not get to see, enjoy and benefit from the technology that would liberate humanity…yet.
For many years I have spoken that the Chemtrails we see in the sky are not placed there just to make us sick, but they are concealing something they don’t want us to see along with changing the planet at the same time. This is where we go deeper into the rabbit hole and I am thought to be making up conspiracy theories by some. The Chemtrails serve multiple purposes; apart from making people sick. I don’t claim to know all of them, but one has been recently confirmed, that I have long stated.
#1) I have felt for some time that there is a massive Geoengineering Program taking place and our planet is being terraformed. All the major and western nations are in agreement. Why? A short quick answer. As we have been stating for many years, the elite are preparing the planet to be ruled by the losing side (fallen angels/aliens). They need the atmosphere to be changed in order to live here. They and their human and hybrid counterparts on Earth are too arrogant to accept they will not prevail. One of the main purposes for CERN’s existence is to open portals and bring in Nephilim overlords and Fallen Angels/Aliens imprisoned and trapped, in the 4th dimension and other realms. They want to return to rule the planet, as in pre-Flood times, and our solar system; as gods of this world. They forget, “The Earth is Yahweh’s (the LORD) and all that dwells within it.” There are many prophecies in the Bible that foretell of the kings of Earth actually wanting to make war with Yahweh in a battle that will take place in the literal heavens (sky, space). Here are a few:
“Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his anointed, saying, He that sits in the heavens shall laugh:the Lord shall have them in derision.” Psalms 2
“These 10 kings shall make war with the Lamb, and the Lamb shall overcome them: for he is Lord of lords, and King of kings: and they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful.” Revelation 17:14
#2) The hi-tech ships (UFO’s) flying in our atmosphere are moving about more frequently during the daylight hours. The Chemtrails are sprayed to conceal the increasingly heavy traffic, making them hard to be seen in our atmosphere. Just about a week or so ago, two pilots flying over Arizona witnessed a fast moving craft. Finally, they are allowing reported sightings by pilots to make headline news.
#3) I have recent learned that the Chemtrails are also being used to conceal a giant New Planetary Bodies that’s becoming more obvious as they get closer to Earth in our solar system. They wont be hid for much longer, as you will clearly see in the recent videos below. There is a reason behind the early morning, odd hours and evening layers of Chemtrails blanketing our skies. (Thanks James Triplett for the video)
Have you heard of NASA’s Sun Simulator? About 20,000 ft in the sky is a Sun Simulator that tracks the movement of the Sun and mimics it. If at times the Sun seems smaller or larger or somewhat distorted from it’s spherical shape, you are most likely seeing the hexagon shaped Sun Simulator. Other countries such as Germany and China also have giant Sun Simulators. Germany recently launched the world’s largest Sun Simulator. Why would we need to have a Sun Simulator? There are many reasons science will give us, but one of the main reasons at this time is to further conceal the New Planetary System of gigantic planets that have entered our inner solar system and will soon be seen by all. Read More

Pole Shift imminent THE SAFE ZONES

Lava From Kilauea Boils Away Freshwater Lake In Hawaii

[NPR] Green Lake was gone in hours.
Lava from Kilauea volcano spilled across highways and into Hawaii's Green Lake — a major source of freshwater on Hawaii's Big Island — and evaporated all the water, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.
The flow created a huge plume of steam as it hit the lake Saturday on its way toward the ocean, according to Hawaii County Civil Defense agency.
"The lava is quite hot, so it boiled away the water," Sally Sennert, a USGS volcanologist embedded at the Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program, tells NPR.
"The lava flows, like a stream of water, are going to take the path of least resistance as they flow downhill," Sennert says, adding that she doubts the lake will return. "All I've heard is reports that lava has filled it up," she says.
The lava entered Green Lake at 10 a.m. local time and had evaporated all the water by 3 p.m., according to the USGS.
Rivers of lava from Kilauea have claimed hundreds of homes and displaced thousands of people since a major eruption more than a month ago. A total of 22 fissures have opened up, according to Hawaii Public Radio.
The lava has advanced at 656 yards per hour, the fastest lava flow rate on record, according to the USGS.
The agency warns that there are still "vigorous lava eruptions" in the lower East Rift Zone, making the Pacific Ocean dangerous to enter in that area. Lava flowing into the ocean can cause explosions, propel rocks and create plumes of "laze," which Hawaii County officials describe as hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles. Read More

Saturday, May 26, 2018

We don't need nearly as much protein as we consume

[BBC] In the early 20th Century, Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson spent a collective five years eating just meat. This meant that his diet consisted of around 80% fat and 20% protein. Twenty years later, he did the same as part of a year-long experiment at the New York City’s Bellevue Hospital in 1928.
Stefansson wanted to disprove those who argued that humans cannot survive if they only eat meat. But unfortunately for him, in both settings he very quickly became ill when he was eating lean meats without any fat. He developed "protein poisoning”, nicknamed “rabbit starvation”. His symptoms disappeared after he lowered his protein intake and he raised his fat intake. In fact, after returning to New York City and to a typical US diet with more normal levels of protein, he reportedly found his health deteriorating and returned to a low-carb, high fat, and high protein diet until his death aged 83.
His early experiments are some of the few recorded cases of high protein intake having extreme adverse effects – but despite soaring sales of protein supplements, many of us are still unsure how much protein we need, how best to consume it, and if too much, or too little, is dangerous.
Despite obesity rates doubling over the past two decades, we’re becoming increasingly conscious of what we’re eating. In recent years many of us have swapped white bread for brown and wholemeal bread and full-fat milk for skimmed. Taking centre stage in our health kick is protein, with protein balls, bars and enhanced protein versions of staple products, from cereals to soup, dominating supermarket shelves. And with the global protein supplements market valued at $12.4bn (£9.2bn) in 2016, it’s clear we’re buying into the idea that we need as much protein as possible.
But some experts now argue that foods with inflated protein (and prices) are a waste of money. Read More

Experts: 'Alarming' drought conditions hit U.S. Southwest

[FOX10] Rivers and watering holes are drying up, popular mountain recreation spots are closing and water restrictions are in full swing as a persistent drought intensifies its grip on pockets of the American Southwest.
Climatologists and other experts on Wednesday provided an update on the situation in the Four Corners region - where Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah meet. They say the area is among the hardest hit and there's little relief expected, and even robust summer rains might not be enough to replenish the soil and ease the fire danger.
The region is dealing with exceptional drought - the worst category. That has left farmers, ranchers and water planners bracing for a much different situation than just a year ago when only a fraction of the region was experiencing low levels of dryness.
Brian Fuchs, a climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center in Nebraska, said people are become more aware and more concerned.
"We've been on this pattern where conditions have dried out, we haven't seen much relief through last summer or into the winter months and here we are going into the summer of 2018 with over two-thirds of the region already in drought," he said. "So that's alarming to say the least."
Portions of the four states are seeing near-record to record dryness. Fuchs explained that some spots have missed out over the last two years on more than 12 inches (30 centimeters) of precipitation - which can add up to as much as a year's worth of rain under normal conditions. Read More

Did Fracking Cause the Hawaii Volcano Eruption?

[USSANews] On the Big Island of Hawaii, where the Kilauea volcano has explosively erupted, there is a geothermal energy plant. It is the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) Plant, in Puna.
There is a long-running debate about whether PGV is fracking. The debate may be a matter of terminology, because in the geothermal process, as hawaiifracking.com reports, “…the drilling and the injection of cold water into hot rocks used in geothermal energy plants does fracture the rocks, which can induce earthquakes and through contamination of the atmosphere and water tables can affect our health and safety.”
Whether deep injection of fluid aims to capture oil, gas, or heat (geothermal), the beginning stage of the process is the same.
Earthquakes induced by this water-injection could obviously trigger a volcano.
For example, here is an alarming article about a geothermal project in Switzerland. Swissinfo.ch, December 10, 2009: “The authorities in canton Basel City say they will cancel a geothermal energy project, which three years ago caused minor tremors that damaged many buildings.”
“A risk analysis study published on Thursday found that the danger of setting off more earthquakes was too great if drilling at the site resumed.”
“The project was put on hold three years ago after thousands of claims for damage were filed with insurers. Total costs for the damage were around SFr9 million ($8.78 million).”
“The study, commissioned by the canton, concluded that Basel was ‘unfavourable’ for geothermal power generation.”
“It said the resumption of Deep Heat Mining project and its operation over a 30-year period could set off around 200 tremors with a strength of up to 4.5 on the Richter Scale – in 2006, the quakes were about 3.4.” Read More

Doctor warns world about “chemtrail lung,” a new health epidemic causing brain and lung problems across society

[Chemtrails North] The existence of chemtrails used to be a topic of debate, but they are now being more widely acknowledged by experts like meteorologists to scientists. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to deny that they exist as more and more people are coming down with illnesses related to chemtrails.
When TV host Rachel Reenstra had trouble overcoming a persistent cough, accompanied by aches, pains, and fever, she visited a doctor. After chest x-rays revealed a type of bronchitis, she was given antibiotics, which only seemed to make her feel worse.
Her doctor told her that lots of bacterial infections are going around, and when she asked him where they are coming from, he told her the truth that many doctors wouldn’t dare reveal to their patients: Chemtrails are at the heart of widespread lung problems right now. Surprised by his candor, she asked if she could videotape him talking about the phenomenon. You can see the video below; the unnamed doctor appears just before the 8-minute mark. View Video

Sunday, April 22, 2018

The Diderot Effect: Why We Want Things We Don’t Need — And What to Do About It


[Medium] The famous French philosopher Denis Diderot lived nearly his entire life in poverty, but that all changed in 1765.
Diderot was 52 years old and his daughter was about to be married, but he could not afford to provide a dowry. Despite his lack of wealth, Diderot’s name was well-known because he was the co-founder and writer of Encyclopédie, one of the most comprehensive encyclopedias of the time.
When Catherine the Great, the emperor of Russia, heard of Diderot’s financial troubles she offered to buy his library from him for £1000 GBP, which is approximately $50,000 USD in 2015 dollars. Suddenly, Diderot had money to spare.[1]
Shortly after this lucky sale, Diderot acquired a new scarlet robe. That’s when everything went wrong.[2]
Diderot’s scarlet robe was beautiful. So beautiful, in fact, that he immediately noticed how out of place it seemed when surrounded by the rest of his common possessions. In his words, there was “no more coordination, no more unity, no more beauty” between his robe and the rest of his items. The philosopher soon felt the urge to buy some new things to match the beauty of his robe.[3]
He replaced his old rug with a new one from Damascus. He decorated his home with beautiful sculptures and a better kitchen table. He bought a new mirror to place above the mantle and his “straw chair was relegated to the antechamber by a leather chair.”
These reactive purchases have become known as the Diderot Effect.
The Diderot Effect states that obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of consumption which leads you to acquire more new things. As a result, we end up buying things that our previous selves never needed to feel happy or fulfilled. Read More

Saturday, April 21, 2018

John Lennon Extols the Virtues of Transcendental Meditation in a Spirited Letter Written to a Beatles Fan (1968)

[Open Culture] An Indian guru travels to the West with teachings of enlightenment, world peace, and liberation from the soul-killing materialist grind. He attracts thousands of followers, some of them wealthy celebrities, and founds a commercial empire with his teachings. No, this isn’t the story of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, the head of the religious movement in Wild Wild Country. There was no miraculous city in the Oregon wilds or fleet of Learjets and Rolls Royces. No stockpile of automatic weapons, planned assassinations, or mass poisonings. Decades before those strange events, another teacher, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi inspired mass devotion among students around the world with the peaceful practice of Transcendental Meditation.
Rolling Stone’s Claire Hoffman—who grew up in a TM community—writes of the movement with ambivalence. For most of his disciples, he was a “Wizard of Oz-type character,” she says, distant and mysterious. But much of what we popularly know about TM comes from its most famous adherents, including Jerry Seinfeld, Katy Perry, David Lynch, the Beach Boys, and, of course, The Beatles, who famously traveled to India in 1968, meditated with Mia Farrow, Donovan, and Mike Love, and wrote some of their wildest, most inventive music after a creative slump following the huge success of Sgt. Pepper’s.
“They stayed in Rishikesh,” writes Maria Popova at Brain Pickings, “a small village in the foothills of the Himalayas, considered the capital of yoga. Immersed in this peaceful community and nurtured by an intensive daily meditation practice, the Fab Four underwent a creative growth spurt—the weeks at Rishikesh were among their most fertile songwriting and composing periods, producing many of the songs on The White Album and Abbey Road.” Unlike most of the Maharishi’s followers, The Beatles got a personal audience. The Indian spiritual teacher “helped them through the shock” of their manager Brian Epstein’s death, and helped them tap into cosmic consciousness without LSD.
They left on a sour note—there were allegations of impropriety, and Lennon, being Lennon, got a bit nasty, originally writing The White Album's “Sexy Sadie” with the lyrics “Maharishi—what have you done? You made a fool of everyone.” But before their falling out with TM’s founder, before even the trip to India, all four Beatles became devoted meditators, sitting for two twenty-minute sessions a day and finding genuine peace and happiness—or “energy,” as Lennon and Harrison describe it in a 1967 interview with David Frost. The next year, happily practicing, and feverishly writing, in India, Lennon received letters from fans, and responded with enthusiasm.
In answer to a letter from a fan named Beth, evidently a devout Christian and apparently threatened by TM and concerned for the bands' immortal souls, Lennon wrote the following (see his handwritten reply at the top):
Dear Beth:
Thank you for your letter and your kind thoughts. When you read that we are in India searching for peace, etc, it is not that we need faith in God or Jesus — we have full faith in them; it is only as if you went to stay with Billy Graham for a short time — it just so happens that our guru (teacher) is Indian — and what is more natural for us to come to India — his home. He also holds courses in Europe and America — and we will probably go to some of these as well — to learn — and to be near him. Read More

The Best Proof of Chemtrails, Geoengineering, and Weather Modification

Friday, April 20, 2018

Be Prepared For The Entire System To Go Dark For 2-3 Days:Jordan Sather

If extinction trends continue, cows may be the largest land animals left on Earth

[Mashable] Cows — simple-minded, prone to belching, and eager to eat — may be the planet's largest land animals in two or three centuries.
But it's not because they're getting any bigger.
Rather, these approximately 2,000-pound ungulates could be the largest land mammals left alive in the next few hundred years.
Ever since our human ancestors became interested in eating meat some 1.8 million years ago, the biggest animals have been expertly hunted, driving populations down.
In fact, spear-wielding hunters, not climate change, could be the defining reason for the steady demise of Earth's largest mammals, argue scientists in a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
The trend, they say, continues today.
"The only time being big is bad is when humans are involved," Felisa Smith, a professor of biology at the University of New Mexico and lead author of the study, said in an interview.
"We are efficient predators and have been for a really long time — so there's not a value judgment here — it's just what hominids did," said Smith.
There's an ingrained idea that being big, like a rhino or wooly mammoth, naturally predisposes a mammal to extinction, particularly during times when the climate substantially changes.
"But that's wrong," she said. "Shifts in climate influenced adaptions, but they didn’t drive extinction."
In the past, large mammals could avoid extinction by traveling elsewhere, to more suitable habitat. "They’ve dealt with climate before," Smith said. But with human development and the destruction of wilderness, that option has largely disappeared.
"Today the problem is we’ve cut off adaption," said Smith. "Big mammals are hemmed in by development and human influence."
Smith and her research team analyzed 65 million years of mammalian fossil data on each continent (excluding Antarctica), splitting this vast period into 1 million year intervals and assessing mammal diversity and extinctions at each time. Read More

Melting Permafrost Emits More Methane Than Scientists Thought

[EcoWatch] Methane emissions are the source of the greenhouse gas which, after carbon dioxide, probably causes climatologists more sleepless nights than any of the other gases. And now it appears they have quite a lot more to bother them than they had realized.
Methane is reckoned to be at least 30 times more powerful than CO2 at warming the earth, with some estimates putting its potency much higher still. The good news, research has suggested, is that there is far less methane than CO2 in the atmosphere to worry about.
The bad news, announced by an international research team, is that previous calculations may have been seriously wrong, and that thawing permafrost is likely to be producing appreciably more methane than anyone had thought.
The researchers were headed by Christian Knoblauch of the Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, make it possible to predict better how much of this significant gas may be released by the thawing of the Arctic permafrost.
Methane and carbon dioxide are both produced in thawing permafrost as dead animal and plant remains decompose. But methane is formed only in the absence of oxygen. Until now, scientists had also thought that more greenhouse gases were formed when the ground was dry and well aerated—in other words, when oxygen was available.
So they did not expect much methane to be produced by the thawing permafrost. What Dr. Knoblauch and his colleagues have now shown is that water-saturated permafrost soils without oxygen can be twice as harmful to the climate as dry soils—which means the role of methane has been greatly underestimated. Read More

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The world faces a future of floods, famine, and extreme heat — here's how we survive

[Business Insider] The warnings were plentiful. The limits were clearly defined.
We have long understood how to keep the Earth's average temperature from reaching dangerous levels. But as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere continue to trap more heat, we're now face-to-face with the volatile climate, intense heat waves, and large-scale storms scientists predicted decades ago.
Substantial damage is already locked in, even if emissions — the cause of the problem — are quickly cut. The question is no longer whether we can prevent a climate crisis. It's: Now what?
Scientists, planners, engineers, and entrepreneurs are developing solutions and adaptations to address this new reality. But surviving in an inevitably harsher environment will require fundamental changes to the way we eat, live, build, and power the world.
Business Insider reporters have spent months reporting on the changes we need to make and the people trying to make them for a series titled 'Saving Our World.' You can see the full series here.
The world faces a future of floods, famine, and extreme heat — here's what it'll take to bounce back: We are on the cusp of the greatest disaster-response effort in history. Here's how we can be resilient in the face of weather catastrophes and rising seas.
Miami is racing against time to keep up with sea-level rise: When the flooding is really bad, water doesn't just fill the streets outside Manolo Pedraza's house. It bubbles up through a shower drain. Miami is already struggling with flooding related to sea-level rise. This is how bad it could get, and what the city is doing to save itself.
Our buildings can't withstand extreme weather — these new structures could save lives: These new types of architecture are preparing us for a future when storms and other climate-related disasters become more common and severe.
The way Americans get electricity is one natural disaster away from decimation — but a resilient power grid is within our reach: America's energy infrastructure is crumbling, but the country has the opportunity to shift to a flexible, clean, resilient power grid. Several new energy projects are lighting the way. Read More

Taming the Mighty Mississippi May Have Caused Bigger Floods

[Scientific American] When record rains mingled with spring snowmelt in the lower Mississippi River Basin in April 2011, liquid disaster flowed southward and forced some hard choices: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blasted a hole in a levee in the river system to save the city of Cairo, Ill., from inundation—at the expense of more than 100,000 acres of farmland. Mandatory evacuations were ordered in Memphis, where floodwaters lapped at historic Beale Street. Officials opened two spillways in Louisiana to protect New Orleans and Baton Rouge, sacrificing farms and coastal oyster beds.
The crisis would ultimately cause $2.8 billion in damage, according to the Corps. And it is one of many recent examples of the way the restless river has pummeled surrounding communities. Unusual floods struck throughout the basin during winter 2015–16, and more swamped parts of Illinois, Arkansas and Missouri after torrential rains in 2017. Snowmelt swells the Mississippi every spring, but the river reached flood stage in Memphis a month earlier than usual in 2018 due to heavy February rains.
Now a new study raises the possibility much of the effort humans have put into trying to control the mighty river has paradoxically made its large floods more destructive. The magnitude of so-called 100-year floods—massive inundations defined as having a 1 percent chance of occurring in any given year—has increased 20 percent in the past five centuries on the lower Mississippi, researchers reported this month in Nature. The bulk of the increase has been in the last 150 years, when human engineering of the river has been most intense. “We’ve channelized the river, we’ve straightened it,” says Samuel Muñoz, lead author of the new study and an assistant professor of marine and environmental sciences at Northeastern University. “We’ve made the gradient steeper, and we’ve encased the river in concrete mats and lined it with levees.” Read More

Your Organic Food Is Treated With Pesticides, Too

[Lifehacker] The Environmental Working Group has released their latest “Dirty Dozen” list of supposedly pesticide-laden fruits and vegetables. (This is a misleading list, as we’ve explained before.) You may be tempted to buy organic produce, as the EWG suggests, but guess what—organic produce is not pesticide-free.
Organic farmers may use pesticides, so long as they choose from a list of approved options. The USDA organic program does not disallow all pesticides, just “synthetic” ones. (By the way, the term “pesticides” includes both bug sprays and weed killers.)
So what remains on our vegetables? The USDA periodically tests produce for pesticide residues; this is the Pesticide Data Program. (The EWG repurposes this data to create their Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen lists.) But the USDA does not test for the presence of organic-allowed pesticides. So the EWG is reporting the stuff on conventional crops without considering what’s present on organic crops.
So, will you lower your pesticide exposure by switching to organic? We don’t know, but the answer may very well be no. Even looking at the synthetic, non-organic pesticides in the USDA’s tests, organic crops don’t always have the lowest amounts. Take strawberries, for example, the “dirtiest” item on the 2018 list: 75 percent of organic strawberries, and 76 percent of conventional strawberries, had pesticide levels that were under 5 percent of the allowable levels.
In other words, buying organic strawberries might expose you to more pesticide residues than buying conventional. We recommend ignoring the Dirty Dozen list entirely, and buying whichever fruits and veggies work for your diet and your budget.

As Mongolia Melts, Looters Close In On Priceless Artifacts

[Smithsonian] The history and archaeology of Mongolia, most famously the sites associated with the largest land empire in the history of the world under Ghengis Khan, are of global importance. But they’re facing unprecedented threats as climate change and looting impact ancient sites and collections.
Climate change and looting may seem to be unrelated issues. But deteriorating climate and environmental conditions result in decreased grazing potential and loss of profits for the region’s many nomadic herders. Paired with a general economic decline, herders and other Mongolians are having to supplement their incomes, turning to alternative ways of making money. For some, it’s searching for ancient treasures to sell on the illegal antiquities market.
The vast Mongolian landscape, whether it be plains, deserts or mountains, is dotted with man-made stone mounds marking the burials of ancient peoples. The practice started sometime in the neolithic period (roughly 6,000-8,000 years ago) with simple stone mounds the size of a kitchen table. These usually contain a human body and a few animal bones.
Over time, the burials became larger (some over 1300 feet long) and more complex, incorporating thousands of horse sacrifices, tools, chariots, tapestries, family complexes, and eventually treasure (such as gold, jewelry and gems).
For Mongolians, these remains are the lasting reminders of their ancient past and a physical tie to their priceless cultural heritage.
Mongolia has reasonably good laws regarding the protection of cultural heritage. But poor understanding of the laws, and the nearly impossible task of enforcing them in such a large space with relatively few people and meager budgets keep those laws from being effective. And laws can’t protect Mongolia’s cultural heritage from climate change. Read More