Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Respected Scientist Validates Public Concern Over Chemtrails

[American Free Press] A respected peer-reviewed scientific journal has boldly published the groundbreaking research of a noted San Diego geoscientist about “chemtrails,” shedding important new light on the murky subject by identifying a particularly hazardous substance being sprayed into the atmosphere.
Dr. J. Marvin Herndon’s paper in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health reveals that this substance is coal fly ash, a byproduct of coal burning.
Coal fly ash is comprised of micron and sub-micron particles that would go up the smokestack unless captured and stored. Because of its adverse environmental health effects, Western nations now require coal-combustion fly ash to be captured and stored.
Used as a Portland cement additive, for agricultural soil amendments, mine reclamation, melting river ice and as subsurface material for roads, coal fly ash also is a concentrated repository for many trace elements: arsenic, barium, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, thallium, thorium, vanadium and uranium.
His paper, entitled “Evidence of Coal Fly Ash Toxic Chemical Geoengineering in the Troposphere: Consequences for Public Health,” should bring much-needed visibility and legitimacy to chemtrails, a subject that’s still unknown to most citizens. The paper vindicates other researchers and activists who’ve been laboring to call attention to those strange cloud-like streaks crisscrossing our skies and their potential dangers.*
“There’s nothing in the scientific literature that I’ve been able to find on this subject,” Herndon told AMERICAN FREE PRESS August 25. “As far as legitimate scientific papers, there appear to be none”—regarding what his paper calls “the intentional and increasingly frequent chemical emplacement [spraying] in the troposphere.” Read More