Friday, November 22, 2013

Seven Volcanoes In Six Different Countries All Start Erupting Within Hours Of Each Other

by Chris Carrington
A new island has appeared in the Pacific. A submarine eruption just off Nishino-Shima Island Japan has erupted for the first time in 40 years. The Japanese Navy noticed the explosions as boiling lava met sea water giving rise to plumes of steam and ash.

Almost 7,000 miles away in Mexico, the Colima volcano blew its top after a period of relative calm. A steam and ash cloud rose two miles into the sky and the grumbling of the mountain could be heard in towns a few miles away.

In Guatemala the ‘Fire Mountain’ belched out lava and sent up a moderate ash cloud causing an ash fall over nearby towns. The explosions and shock waves occurring in the volcano can be felt by residents over 6 miles away. Doors and windows are reported to be rattling, but there has been no damage so far.

In Vanuatu the Yasur volcano is giving some cause for concern. Although the explosions are quite weak the continuous ash that is coming from the mountain is starting to build up on farming land.

Over to Italy, Mount Etna is putting on quite a display. The current eruption started a few days ago and has been getting stronger as time moves on. A massive eruption lit up the sky and disturbed residents yesterday. The ash cloud was high enough to see flights canceled. The lava flow was the biggest in years, and the town of Zafferana which lay in its path saw some damage. Lava diverters were put into place, and most of the town escaped unscathed.


In Indonesia a four mile high ash cloud is making life hard for residents. Mount Sinabung came back to life in 2010 after dormancy of hundreds of years. Occasionally coming to life after its 2010 awakening, the rumbling of the volcano prompted the evacuation of over 6000 people as scientists feared a major eruption. There has been no lava flows so far but the ash cloud is growing.

Still in Indonesia but on the island of Java this time, Mount Merapi exploded yesterday. Hundreds of people were killed when it last erupted in 2010. There is no news of casualties at this point. Read More

Exploring the I Am America Teachings with Lori Toye one of the Top Favorite Shows

 



Conscious Living with Wendy Garrett - 10 Favorite Shows

Around here, however, we don't look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we're curious...and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths. - Walt Disney Company

Of the interviews I have done for Conscious Living, I can't name a best so I opt for Favorites: those that were simply fun to do with people who gave me food for thought and stories to remember.

Favorites are also those that - when I review the show - I feel like any other listener going along for the ride. I sometimes miss out on the best stuff because, while the interview is rolling, I am focused on continuity rather than listening or I am worried because the dogs are barking at the ghosts in the room -- (Gracie) or the mail carrier and the dogs next door -- (Jack). Sigh. That can be frustrating but part of the challenge.

I try to offer a show list occasionally to give you an opportunity to review and/or connect with some of the fascinating people who are reality surfing with us.

Don't get me wrong. My "favorite" list isn't in any certain order and there really are MORE than 10 favorites. But this is the 10 list today. A few guests on the list have more than one show in the library.

Becki Hawkins on Transitions, a nurse's education about death and dying.
Dr. Eben Alexander - Life beyond Death
Everyday Oracles - Anne Bolinger McQuade
Marcia Schafer - Beyond Zebra and extraterrestrial contact
Annie Kagan - The Afterlife of Billy Fingers
Mary Rodwell - Star Children
Leslie Kean - UFOs: Generals, Pilots and Government Officials go on the Record
Lori Toye - I Am America Maps - A Teacher Appears
Kip Hartzell - The Atlantean Chronicles
Edd Edwards - Resonate Energy

Also on itunes - and there are so many great shows here, including Jim Pathfinder Ewing: Shamanism, Bill Sweet: Consciousness, William Buhlman: Out of Body Journeys, Penny Kelly: Kundalini Awakening, Richard Gordon: The New Human, Jon Kelly: Backward Speech... read the show description for content details then listen and enjoy!

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

It’s Not a Fairytale: Seattle to Build Nation’s First Food Forest

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.
“This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.
The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.
“The concept means we consider the soils, companion plants, insects, bugs—everything will be mutually beneficial to each other,” says Harrison.
That the plan came together at all is remarkable on its own. What started as a group project for a permaculture design course ended up as a textbook example of community outreach gone right. Read More

Monday, November 18, 2013

Program designed to help prepare for droughts

Federal agencies will provide better and more accessible information about matters such as long-term weather prospects and soil moisture levels under a program designed to help communities prepare for future droughts and respond more effectively when they happen, Obama administration officials said Thursday.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will lead the initiative, which grew out of a series of regional forums held in response to the 2012 drought, the most severe and widespread in more than 70 years. It covered more than two-thirds of the continental U.S. and caused more than $30 billion in losses from crop failures, wildfires and other ripple effects.
"We were very aggressive in responding to the drought but all of it was after the fact," Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in an interview with The Associated Press. "We made money available for technical assistance after the fact. We provided disaster loan assistance and extended grazing aid after the fact. We purchased surplus product after the fact."
With droughts likely to become more frequent and widespread as the climate warms, "we have to adjust to this new normal and we have to understand what it means to be proactive instead of just reacting," he said. Read More

Comet ISON starts to brighten, astronomers begin to hope for a show

Astronomers on the ground and more spacecraft than ever before in history have been keeping a watchful eye on Comet ISON as it makes its way perilously close to the sun.
The 3- to 4-mile-diameter chunk of ice and rock has spent more than 4 billion years in the frozen depths of space, and on Thanksgiving, it will get so close to the sun that it will reach 5,000 degrees — hot enough to melt iron, said Seth Jarvis, director of Clark Planetarium.
In fact, it will get so close to the sun that it will be subject to the powerful tidal forces emitted by the star, and the comet’s nucleus could be torn apart.
ISON began brightening significantly late last week, and if that trend continues, it could make for a sight visible with the naked eye in the low east-southeast horizon in the pre-dawn sky and could last through mid-January. If the comet is torn apart, though, a best-case scenario would be a bright flash visible to Earth, and then nothing more.
"It’s rare that we see a sun grazer that’s significant enough in size that it has a good probability it will survive," Jarvis said. "But that’s the cool stuff, that we’re not sure what’s going to happen." Read More

Mount Etna volcano erupts, lighting up sky over Sicily

ROME — Mount Etna, Europe's most active volcano, has erupted again, lighting up the sky over much of eastern Sicily and shooting up a towering column of ash.
The eruption, which began late Saturday and tapered off Sunday morning, didn't endanger any of the villages dotting the mountain's slopes, and no evacuation was ordered.
The airport in nearby Catania said air space above the volcano was closed to flights, but that the airport itself was operating normally, including takeoffs and departures.
Etna erupts occasionally. Its last major eruption occurred in 1992. Read More

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Super typhoon Haiyan just broke all scientific intensity scales

Writing for Quartz, meteorologist Eric Holthaus says that the super typhoon Haiyan about to hit the Philippines is the worst storm he has ever seen. With sustained winds of 190mph (305km/h) and staggering gusts of 230mph (370km/h), its "intensity has actually ticked slightly above the maximum to 8.1 on an 8.0 scale." Update: It broke 235mph.
Holthaus says that Yolanda—its Filipino name—beats "Wilma (2005) in intensity by 5mph—that was the strongest storm ever in the Atlantic," which makes it a member of the select club of Worst Storms Ever in the Planet. Only three other storms since 1969 have reached this intensity. Read More

Live call with Lori Toye 11.7.2013: Golden Cities, Earth Changes, and Spiritual Development

Up in Arms


Eleven historical and cultural areas of the US may define our stance on violence-related issues.

Tufts Magazine / Colin Woodward

Last December, when Adam Lanza stormed into the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, with a rifle and killed twenty children and six adult staff members, the United States found itself immersed in debates about gun control. Another flash point occurred this July, when George Zimmerman, who saw himself as a guardian of his community, was exonerated in the killing of an unarmed black teenager, Trayvon Martin, in Florida. That time, talk turned to stand-your-ground laws and the proper use of deadly force. The gun debate was refreshed in September by the shooting deaths of twelve people at the Washington Navy Yard, apparently at the hands of an IT contractor who was mentally ill.
Such episodes remind Americans that our country as a whole is marked by staggering levels of deadly violence. Our death rate from assault is many times higher than that of most other countries, whether highly urbanized or sparsely populated. State-sponsored violence, too—in the form of capital punishment—sets our country apart. Last year we executed more than ten times as many prisoners as other advanced industrialized nations combined—not surprising given that Japan is the only other such country that allows the practice. Our violent streak has become almost a part of our national identity.
What’s less well appreciated is how much the incidence of violence, like so many salient issues in American life, varies by region. Beyond a vague awareness that supporters of violent retaliation and easy access to guns are concentrated in the states of the former Confederacy and, to a lesser extent, the western interior, most people cannot tell you much about regional differences on such matters. Our conventional way of defining regions—dividing the country along state boundaries into a Northeast, Midwest, Southeast, Southwest, and Northwest—masks the cultural lines along which attitudes toward violence fall. These lines don’t respect state boundaries. To understand violence or practically any other divisive issue, you need to understand historical settlement patterns and the lasting cultural fissures they established.
The original North American colonies were settled by people from distinct regions of the British Isles—and from France, the Netherlands, and Spain—each with its own religious, political, and ethnographic traits. For generations, these Euro-American cultures developed in isolation from one another, consolidating their cherished religious and political principles and fundamental values, and expanding across the eastern half of the continent in nearly exclusive settlement bands. Throughout the colonial period and the Early Republic, they saw themselves as competitors—for land, capital, and other settlers—and even as enemies, taking opposing sides in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War.
There’s never been an America, but rather several Americas—each a distinct nation. There are eleven nations today. Each looks at violence, as well as everything else, in its own way. Read More

A new, DEVASTATING Chelyabinsk METEOR STRIKE: '7x as likely' as thought

NASA has revealed new research on the Chelyabinsk meteorite that exploded over Russia in February, and the findings aren't good: not only does it look like the astronomic models about the number of similar-sized things reaching Earth are wrong, but also the damage they can do is much greater than expected.
"If you look at the number of impacts detected by US government sensors over the past few decades you find the impact rate of kiloton-class objects is greater than would be indicated by the telescopic surveys," said Bill Cooke, meteoroid environment office lead at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center at a press conference on Wednesday.
"Over the past few decades we've seen an impact rate about seven times greater than the current state of the telescopic surveys would indicate."
Cooke said that as the current state of asteroid surveys was expanded he expected we would find more meteorites in the vicinity to account for these impacts, but also that the amount of damage they caused was being reassessed.
The nuclear model used to estimate the amount of explosive force such incidents could cause had, in fact, been over estimating the blast impacts of such air-bursting meteors, he explained. But the amount of heat they generate, and the damage caused by the shockwave of air they push before them as they come down through the atmosphere, was significantly underestimated.
The Chelyabinsk meteor is the largest foreign body to come down to Earth since the Tunguska event in 1908, where a comet or meteor devastated 2,150 square kilometers of Siberia with an airburst, according to Lindley Johnson, NEO program executive of NASA's planetary science division. Read More

Saturday, November 02, 2013

Hanford nuke plant’s earthquake risk underestimated, group says

(Seattle Times) Sandi Doughton
A new analysis by an anti-nuclear organization says earthquake risks were seriously underestimated when the state’s only commercial nuclear-power plant was built almost 30 years ago on the Hanford nuclear reservation.
Seismic studies since then have uncovered more faults, extended the length of previously known faults and challenged the assumption that large quakes are not likely in the area, says the report from the Washington and Oregon chapters of Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR). Geologists now believe one fault passes a scant 2.3 miles from the 1,170-megawatt plant called the Columbia Generating Station (CGS).
The new evidence suggests that the region could be rocked by shaking two to three times stronger than the plant was designed for, said Terry Tolan, the veteran geologist who prepared the report for PSR.
“No seismic structural upgrades have been made at the Columbia Generating Station despite all of the geologic evidence that has been assembled over the past thirty years which has dramatically increased the seismic risk at this site,” Tolan wrote.
The physician’s group submitted the report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Friday, along with a letter calling on NRC Chairwoman Allison Macfarlane to shut down the reactor until it is upgraded to withstand stronger quakes.
Macfarlane defended the power plant in her response to an earlier letter. “The NRC continues to conclude that CGS has been designed, built and operated to safely withstand earthquakes likely to occur in its region,” she wrote in September. Read More

Friday, November 01, 2013

Bad News for Storm-Battered Europe: There's More Extreme Weather on the Horizon

Europe began this week bracing itself against one of the most powerful storms in years. Gusts of 99 m.p.h. trailed across parts of southern Britain before heading toward mainland northwestern Europe, causing havoc in France, Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark. At least 13 people have been reported dead and hundreds of thousands have been left without power or stranded on planes, trains and ferries.
The bad news for Europe as it begins the cleanup operation and assesses the financial cost of the damage (Britain’s Great Storm of 1987, which left 18 dead and felled 15 million trees, caused $3.5 billion in damage in today’s terms) is that there’s likely more extreme weather to come.
A new report on extreme-weather events by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and the European national science academies suggests that “some of the extreme weather phenomena associated with climate change are increasing in frequency and intensity within Europe.” They also say that “human activity has been the cause of more profound and rapid change” for the earth’s climate. Read More