Sunday, October 04, 2015

Historic Rainfall Pummels the Carolinas and Floods Charleston

[Slate] As Hurricane Joaquin slowly pulls away from U.S. shores, a veritable firehose of rain is being directed at parts of South Carolina—including Charleston. The result: An ongoing flooding risk that may peak at historic levels. On Saturday, President Obama declared a state of emergency in South Carolina to speed up the flow of disaster aid to the stricken state.
As of midday, nearly 20 inches of rain had fallen in parts of South Carolina in the previous 24 hours alone, according to estimates from weather radar. That’s nearly four months of rainfall in a single day, and it exceeds the National Weather Service’s already-dire predictions.
The Charleston region appears to be among the worst-hit so far, though heavy rain is falling across much of the Southeast, from the northern Atlanta suburbs to North Carolina. More than a foot of rain has already fallen in Charleston since the downpour began on Thursday, and much more is on the way. By 8 a.m. Saturday, Charleston had already broken its daily rainfall record of 3.28 inches, set in 1994. By Saturday afternoon, it had doubled the previous record.
When combined with persistent, strong onshore winds, the heavy rain created an exceptional coastal flood in the city on Saturday afternoon—the worst in Charleston Harbor since Hurricane Hugo’s landfall in 1989. Several water rescues were reported in the historic downtown, as waves lapped over seawalls and flooded the low-lying city. Police closed traffic on all roads into and out of Charleston early Saturday in an effort to prevent vehicles from getting stranded or washed away. By Saturday afternoon, police were going door to door in the hardest-hit areas and advising residents to voluntarily evacuate, fire stations were being converted into temporary shelters, and the city was providing free sandbags. Read More

The Great Quake and the Great Drowning

[Hakai Magazine] In the year 1700, on January 26, at 9:00 at night, in what is now northern California, Earthquake was running up and down the coast. His feet were heavy and when he ran he shook the ground so much it sank down and the ocean poured in. “The earth would quake and quake again and quake again,” said the Yurok people. “And the water was flowing all over.” The people went to the top of a hill, wearing headbands of woodpecker feathers, so they could dance a jumping dance that would keep the earthquake away and return them to their normal lives. But then they looked down and saw the water covering their village and the whole coast; they knew they could never make the world right again.
That same night, farther up the coast in what is now Washington, Thunderbird and Whale had a terrible fight, making the mountains shake and uprooting the trees, said the Quileute and the Hoh people; they said the ocean rose up and covered the whole land. Farther north still, on Vancouver Island, dwarfs who lived in a mountain invited a person to dance around their drum; the person accidentally kicked the drum and got earthquake-foot, said the Nuu-chah-nulth people, and after that every step he took caused an earthquake. The land shook and the ocean flooded in, said the Huu-ay-aht people who are part of the Nuu-chah-nulth, and people didn’t even have time to wake up and get into their canoes, and “everything then drifted away, everything was lost and gone.”
Here’s what geologists say: the earthquake that almost certainly occurred on the night of January 26, 1700, ruptured North America’s Pacific Northwest coast for hundreds of kilometers, from northern California, through Oregon and Washington, to southern Vancouver Island. Along this coast, the Juan de Fuca plate was pushing under the larger North American plate, had gotten stuck—locked—but kept pushing until it released, abruptly and violently. The earthquake that resulted was probably a magnitude 9, about as big as earthquakes get. The coast dropped by as much as two meters, and a tsunami brought floods more than 300 meters inland.
Geologists now know that the Pacific Northwest has been having these earthquakes and tsunamis irregularly every 500 years or so; their oldest record in sediments goes back at least 10,000 years. The evidence is massive: subsided marshes, drowned forests, sediment layers showing enormous landslides that flowed out on the ocean floor, seismic profiles of the Juan de Fuca plate, and satellite measurements of a coast deforming from the stress of a plate that’s once again locked. In the next 50 years, the chance of another magnitude 9 earthquake there is 1 in 10. Read More

Revealing Data Confirms Geoengineering Is Stealing Rain From The Western US

[GeoEngineeringWatch] So many forecasts for rain in the US West no longer develop. In recent years this scenario has become the rule, not the exception. The stated purpose for "solar radiation management" (SRM) is to block the sun with light scattering particles and thus to create as much atmospheric haze or cloud cover as possible (no matter how toxic that cloud cover is). Excessive atmospheric particulates cause profound disruptions to precipitation.  All too often in recent years, rain that should have fallen in the US West has consistently been blocked by two primary means, atmospheric aerosol saturation and the "ridiculously resilient ridge" of constant high pressure that has been consistently maintained over the US West. This scenario has been used to keep the Eastern US cooled down at the cost of catastrophic drought and heat in the West.
The eastern half of the North American continent has been the most anomalously cool zone in the entire world for almost three years. This is not due to natural variability, it is a direct result of climate engineering. Engineered snow storms are an ongoing reality and the Eastern US has been an epicenter of such weather assaults. The Chinese government openly admitted to engineering snowstorms until they did a billion dollars worth of damage to Beijing. 
When moisture is allowed to flow over the West, it is commonly scattered by the jet aircraft aerosol spraying assault. This spraying creates too many cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). When the quantities of CCN's are too high, moisture droplets cannot combine and fall as rain, thus the moisture just continues to migrate. Read More

Seed Saving for Beginners